Risks of mental ill-health in the traces of the virus
                     Johan Åhlén.             

Johan Åhlén. Picture: Anna Molander

                 

            

                

                    

                        

                            

Johan Åhlén.

                        

                        

Johan Åhlén. Picture: Anna Molander

                    

                

            

        

    

The corona crisis risks leading to widespread mental ill health in society, according to a new report. Not least, caregivers and persons with intensive care can suffer, for example, from depression or post-traumatic stress.

                        

Corona pandemic has in a short time created a great concern in many. But even in the longer term, the outbreak of the virus can have a major impact on mental health, states the Center for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, CES, in the Stockholm region.

Among other things, the healthcare staff and the intensive care patients are highlighted as risk groups.

We really wanted to look a little more at the population level, but we ended up in that it is important to lift the health care staff and patients, says Johan Åhlén, psychologist and deputy head of the mental health unit at CES.

There are two particularly stressed groups in what is happening now.

It’s hard to find past events to compare covid-19 with, he notes. Closest may be the SARS outbreak in Asia 2002-2003 and the financial crisis 2008-2009.

Around both events there are studies that point out increased mental illness such as depression and post-traumatic stress, PTSD, as one of the consequences.

Right now, of course, saving lives is the focus, so it might seem a bit strange to bring this up, says Johan Åhlén.

But for example it can be important to the emergency phase gives short stakes to the staff who now work under the stressful conditions. It is important to lift, although it can be difficult to get to.

The CES report also refers, among other things, to a study of patients treated for emergency care. respiratory failure, where 43 percent at the time of discharge met the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder.

Here, too, there is help to get, points out Johan Åhlén

If you are thinking about an intensive care situation, where you do not know if you will survive or not. Obviously, it is an incredibly scary experience, you can understand that, he says.

But the good thing here is that for PTSD, there is good treatments. So if you identify these people early, there are good opportunities to help them as well.

                    

    

        

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